Tag Archives: Film Review

Calm With Horses (Review) – The flickering light of redemption in a brutal world

Based on the award-winning short story by Colin Barrett, and adapted for the screen by Joe Murtagh. Director Nick Rowland’s Calm With Horses is nothing short of electric crime drama. In a debut feature film that explores masculinity, community and crime without broad brush stereotypes or cliches. Wrapping the audience in a heart-breaking and violent portrait of limited opportunity, social …

And Then We Danced (Review) – Shattering the personal, cultural and artistic chains of homophobia

I have often commented on the bravery of bringing LGBTQ stories to our screens from those countries where oppression is still rife. But when this bravery is coupled with a mission to break down the stereotypes and perceptions leading to segregation and discrimination. While exploring culture, identity and history that directly influences homophobic actions. Film can not only open doors …

The Invisible Man (Review) – The hidden horror of domestic abuse

From the award winning success of Get Out through to disappointing paint by numbers horror of Ma. Blumhouse Productions has provided a mixed bag of quality and innovation since its launch in 2010. However, nobody could dismiss the shear creativity of the modern horror platform that Blumhouse has created. One that has ensured horror in all its forms has continued …

True History of the Kelly Gang (Review) – The hormonal energy of rebellion in a brutal new world

History is full of figures who have fought institutionalised oppression by breaking laws, and even taking lives only to become legends of folklore. Whether they be Dick Turpin or Jesse James, those who target the very foundations of a countries inequality. Often find themselves raised onto pedestals mixing truth with fantasy long after their death. In Australia, Ned Kelly and …

Waiting for Anya (Review) – A compelling story that sings with sincerity, while often lacking bite

Based on Michael Morpurgo’s novel, first published in 1990. Director Ben Cookson navigates the tightrope of bringing holocaust drama to children’s orientated filmmaking. While embracing the challenge of filming entirely on location. With the French mountain village at the centre of Morpurgo’s book, providing an important backdrop to the narrative. Creating a film that excels in both visual style and …

A Streetcar Named Desire (Retrospective Review) – A stunning and powerful piece of cinema that still crawls under the skin

Let me take you back to the 24th Academy Awards (OSCARS) of 1951. A year when the film version of Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire found itself bagging twelve nominations. Making Oscar history in winning three prominent categories; Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress. However, despite this success two awards evaded the films reach. With the …

A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood (Review) – An affectionate journey into forgiveness and healing

Anyone living outside of the United States could be forgiven for not knowing who Fred Rogers was. His status as a US national treasure born from his children’s TV show, ‘Mister Rogers Neighbourhood’. A show that ran from 1968 to 2001 on the PBS network. It may therefore, come as no surprise that Marielle Heller’s new film ‘A Beautiful Day …

The Turning (Review) – A confused take on the Henry James classic

Henry James 1898 novella ‘The Turn of Screw’ has found itself the subject of several cinematic adaptations and interpretations over the years. The most notable of these being Jack Clayton’s exquisite and unparalleled The Innocents in 1961. However, with The Turning director Floria Sigismondi attempts to take the gothic horror of Henry James into 1990’s America. While equally playing with …

The Personal History of David Copperfield (Review) – Dickens classic finds a new voice

Placing Charles Dickens classic novel David Copperfield into the hands of Armando Iannucci (The Death of Stalin), may sound rather audacious. But Iannucci’s love of all things Dickens found itself highlighted back in 2012. With the fabulous BBC documentary ‘Armando’s Tale of Charles Dickens‘. In which the writer/director explored Dickens work with contemporary social eye. While equally focussing on the …

Bombshell (Review) – An important but confused take on corporate discrimination

For many years Fox News has provided America with a twisted, often controversial and evangelical right wing voice. Therefore, it is somewhat surprising that one of best known cases of the early #MeToo movement, came from the heart of Murdoch’s right wing news operation. Focussing on the abuse of corporate power, and the misogyny of a CEO (Roger Ailes) who …