LGBTQ – The Best of 2019

The Shiny Shrimps (Review) – A heartwarming cocktail of humour and belonging

‘Les Crevettes Pailletées’ Inspired by the real life LGBTQ water polo team that debut director Cédric Le Gallo is a member of. While also transferring the directors real life experience into a fictional story of the sporting underdog. The Shiny Shrimps may not offer a completely unique cinematic experience, but does shine with both comedy and love. While equally bringing …

This is Not Berlin – Coming of age in a haze of art, sex, music and drugs

‘Esto no es Berlín’ Hari Sama’s semi-autobiographical new film ‘This is Not Berlin’ buzzes with the vibrant and intoxicating energy of 1980’s counterculture. Coupled with the freshly emerging punk and new wave scene of 80s Mexico City. A scene that sweeps two teenage friends into an emerging world of art, sex, risk and liberation. Their friendship challenged and changed as …

Monsoon (Review) – A journey into cultural identity and belonging

Hong Khaou’s second film ‘Monsoon‘ follows on from the themes of grief, cultural identity and belonging of his first feature ‘Lilting‘. While also charting a different path to his debut feature. As he explores the death of a parent and the need of second generation children in discovering the cultural identity and heritage of family. The directors trademark sensitivity and …

Matthias and Maxime (Review) – A beautiful portrait of male love and friendship

Friendships change over time, especially the ones born of childhood and adolescence. Sometimes those friendships hide the true feelings of the journey from boy to man (or girl to woman). While sometimes those that hide repressed desire can surface on the road to adult life. These are all themes that Xavier Dolan’s latest film explores with tenderness and ease. Bound …

Tremors (Review) – The conflicted interface between faith, love & community

In 2015 Guatemalan Director Jayro Bustamante received an Oscar nomination for his debut feature Ixcanul. While also winning the Alfred Bauer Prize at the 65th Berlin International Film Festival for the same feature. Now with his latest picture Tremors (Temblores). Bustamante delves into the world of gay conversation therapy, family and faith in a polarised Guatemalan community. Tremors is certainly …

Rialto (Review) – A lifetime of emotional containment released

Premiering at this years Venice Film Festival. Peter Mackie Burns latest film ‘Rialto’ offers a stunning and nuanced journey into emotional containment, belonging and identity. While creating an unlikely safe space in the relationship between a teenage rent boy and a father whose life in spiralling out of control. Colm (Tom Vaughan-Lawlor) has spent his life working the docks of …

We the Animals (Review)

Based on Justin Torre’s acclaimed novel ‘We the Animals’. Jeremiah Zager’s debut feature based not only creates a visually stunning, powerful and poetic film. But also encapsulates the haunting effects of childhood poverty, family breakdown and emerging sexuality. From the very start We the Animals pulls no punches in its child centred view of family life, confusion and brotherly love. While weaving …

Rocketman (Review)

Fresh from rescuing the Freddie Mercury and Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody after the removal of its director Bryan Singer. Dexter Fletcher brings us the glowing, fabulous and utterly compelling Rocketman. Bringing to life the career of Elton John with stunning cinematography, performances and energy. In a pure fantasia of music, creativity and emotion. From its opening scenes Rocketman isn’t afraid …

Making Montgomery Clift – A fresh perspective on the life of a Hollywood giant

On the 23rd July 1966 Montgomery Clift died of heart failure at his New York apartment aged 45. Leaving behind a legacy of world class film and theatre that pushed the boundaries of masculinity on screen. In the years following Clift’s death, a picture was painted of a man struggling with his sexuality, drink and drugs; a tragic character who …