Film of the Week

Shine Your Eyes: Family, love, belonging and obsession on the bustling streets of Sao Paulo

The year is 1988, the country, Nigeria. Two young brothers lay talking, gazing into one another’s eyes as the sun streams through a window. The older brother ‘Ikenna’ telling his younger brother ‘Amadi’ that they are one. His soul reincarnated into his young brother. A shadow of control and subservience descending on the younger brother that will affect the destiny …

Around the Sun – The mysteries of life in a universe of possibilities

In 1686 the philosopher and scientist Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle published Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds. A pioneering mix of discussion and science that centred on his five-night stay at a chateau in France. The conversations with his hostess focusing on the nature of the universe and planets. And the infinite possibilities of the stars above us. These themes …

Film of the Week – Welcome to Chechnya

Welcome to Chechnya is now available to stream on BBC iPlayer As someone who has spent my adult life fighting for LGBTQ equality, I watched the growing persecution of LGBTQ people in Russia with horror. The introduction of the 2013 ‘gay propaganda law’ a mere tool for state sanctioned oppression. As men, teenagers and woman found themselves subject to horrific …

Fanny Lye Deliver’d (2019) – Film of the Week

Thomas Clay’s third highly anticipated film ‘Fanny Lye Deliver’d’ has had a long and challenging journey to the screen. Languishing in post production for almost three years due to funding pressures. However, after much delay it premiered at the BFI London Film Festival in 2019. With Vertigo Releasing now bringing the film to a wider audience via streaming services. But …

Heartstone (Hjartasteinn) 2016 – Film of the Week

At what age does the freedom and innocence of childhood become consumed by the mists of adolescence? The answer, of course, differs for every person, the journey to adulthood one of personal self-discovery. It’s jarring and uncomfortable dawn bringing with it the realities of adult life, sex, and relationships. Creating a transition that is often both painful and joyous in …

Days of the Bagnold Summer – Film of the Week

Do you remember the long summer holidays away from school at the tender age of 15? For many of us, we now look back at this time through the rose-tinted specs of adulthood. But the truth is these breaks were often painful, disappointing and challenging for both us and our parent/s. Our hormonal confusion and desire for freedom clashing with …

Saint Frances – A refreshingly honest and lovingly crafted comedy/drama

Saint Frances Film Review

This review is brought to you in partnership with our friends at Vertigo Releasing While the thematic base of Alex Thompson’s debut feature film ‘Saint Frances’ may sit within the familiar territory of thirty-something disillusionment. His film transcends the usual comedy/drama tropes of the subject, by embracing a frank, honest and loving exploration of the female experience. Layering this with …

Slow West (2015) – Film of the Week

British writer/director/musician John Maclean’s 2015 debut feature is a glittering gem at the heart of the western genre. One that sings with originality and difference as art and lyrical storytelling combine to create a cinematic composition of haunting beauty. One that wraps the viewer in a journey of love and innocence against a backdrop of melancholy and violence. While injecting the …

A Clockwork Orange (1971) – Film of the Week

Removed from British screens by its director just two years after its release. A Clockwork Orange has become part of cinematic folklore. It’s complicated and uncomfortable themes continuing to burrow into the minds of new audiences 49 years later; the sheer genius of the man who brought it to the big screen haunting the public and critical opinion of its …

Benny’s Video (1992) – Film of the Week

As a director, Michael Haneke is well known for producing films that reflect and challenge our notions of social development. While in turn, polarising audiences and critics alike with tough and often uncomfortable reflections of our own humanity. His films have ranged from the Piano Teacher to The White Ribbon, each one wrapping audiences in themes of isolation and estrangement. …