2020

The Lawyer (Review) – Two worlds collide in Belgrade

‘Advokatas’ Despite BFI Flare having fallen foul of the current global pandemic. Here at Cinerama Film we remain committed to bringing you some of the best films this years festival had to offer. Working with filmmakers and publicists who have seen world premiere’s of their hard work sadly delayed or cancelled. We are therefore delighted to bring you a review …

Calm With Horses (Review) – The flickering light of redemption in a brutal world

Based on the award-winning short story by Colin Barrett, and adapted for the screen by Joe Murtagh. Director Nick Rowland’s Calm With Horses is nothing short of electric crime drama. In a debut feature film that explores masculinity, community and crime without broad brush stereotypes or cliches. Wrapping the audience in a heart-breaking and violent portrait of limited opportunity, social …

And Then We Danced (Review) – Shattering the personal, cultural and artistic chains of homophobia

I have often commented on the bravery of bringing LGBTQ stories to our screens from those countries where oppression is still rife. But when this bravery is coupled with a mission to break down the stereotypes and perceptions leading to segregation and discrimination. While exploring culture, identity and history that directly influences homophobic actions. Film can not only open doors …

Onward (Review) – Brotherly love in a world that’s lost its magic

It is hard to believe that Toy Story burst on to our screens 25 years ago, changing animation forever. While equally embedding the wonderful worlds created by Pixar into our collective conciousness. However, as time has passed has the magic of Pixar slowly diminished? And can Pixar still find original stories that engage and inspire new generations of children and …

Dark Waters – A stunning dissection of corporate greed and corruption

The legal drama/thriller has been a mainstay of cinema for a number of years. Enthralling audiences with stories of the lone legal professional taking on the military, government or business for public good. However, these drama’s are often simplistic in tone, summarising long and bitter legal battles in 150 minutes of screen time. But with Todd Haynes (Carol) latest film …

The Invisible Man (Review) – The hidden horror of domestic abuse

From the award winning success of Get Out through to disappointing paint by numbers horror of Ma. Blumhouse Productions has provided a mixed bag of quality and innovation since its launch in 2010. However, nobody could dismiss the shear creativity of the modern horror platform that Blumhouse has created. One that has ensured horror in all its forms has continued …

True History of the Kelly Gang (Review) – The hormonal energy of rebellion in a brutal new world

History is full of figures who have fought institutionalised oppression by breaking laws, and even taking lives only to become legends of folklore. Whether they be Dick Turpin or Jesse James, those who target the very foundations of a countries inequality. Often find themselves raised onto pedestals mixing truth with fantasy long after their death. In Australia, Ned Kelly and …

Waiting for Anya (Review) – A compelling story that sings with sincerity, while often lacking bite

Based on Michael Morpurgo’s novel, first published in 1990. Director Ben Cookson navigates the tightrope of bringing holocaust drama to children’s orientated filmmaking. While embracing the challenge of filming entirely on location. With the French mountain village at the centre of Morpurgo’s book, providing an important backdrop to the narrative. Creating a film that excels in both visual style and …

Birds of Prey (And The Fantabulous Emancipation Of One Harley Quinn) Review

Back in 2016 Margot Robbie stormed onto our screens as the anarchic DC comics favourite Harley Quinn. The ex-PHD psychotherapist who became the Joker’s right hand woman following a rebirth at ACE chemicals. And while Suicide Squad was far from perfect as an introductory film. It is fair to say that Robbie’s Harley Quinn shone through an otherwise mediocre affair. …

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Review) – An exquisite journey into memory, desire, love and sisterhood

‘Portrait de la jeune fille en feu’ Writer and director Céline Sciamma is renowned for her beautiful and nuanced coming of age films. With a back catalogue filled with stunning reflections on the transition to adulthood, from Water Lilies to Tomboy. However, with her latest film ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’, Sciamma breaks with her own convention. While equally …