BFI London Film Festival 2019

Marriage Story – The complexities of family breakdown

Arriving 40 years after Robert Benton’s Oscar winning Kramer vs Kramer. Noah Baumbach’s Marriage Story may just follow in the award winning footsteps of its predecessor in 2020. By creating a film that not only echoes the character driven drama of Robert Benton’s movie. But also offers both a personal and assured reflection of the complexities of marriage and divorce …

The Irishman – Goodbye to the Goodfellas

It is hard to believe that is was almost 25 years ago that Martin Scorsese brought us Casino, starring Joe Pesci and Robert De Niro. A film that many thought would mark the end of the Pesci – DeNiro partnership born in the 1980 film Raging Bull. While Al Pacino although having worked De Niro on The Godfather, never crossed …

Saint Maud (Review) – Visceral horror of the highest order

Spoiler Free Religious fervour mixes with mental illness in a film that takes you to the very edges of psychological horror. Director Rose Glass’ debut feature providing visceral horror of the highest order. Wrapping its audience in a nerve shredding world of mental decline. The escape door firmly closed as we follow a deeply troubled young care worker into a …

Knives Out (Review) – A genre reborn in a sizzling whodunit

Knives Out is a pure joy to watch, as Director Rian Johnson breathes new life into the classic whodunit genre. While celebrating the genius of Agatha Christie in a film that plays homage to her writing. While also treading new ground, with a script that brings the whodunit up to date. In a large sprawling manor house outside Boston the …

This is Not Berlin – Coming of age in a haze of art, sex, music and drugs

‘Esto no es Berlín’ Hari Sama’s semi-autobiographical new film ‘This is Not Berlin’ buzzes with the vibrant and intoxicating energy of 1980’s counterculture. Coupled with the freshly emerging punk and new wave scene of 80s Mexico City. A scene that sweeps two teenage friends into an emerging world of art, sex, risk and liberation. Their friendship challenged and changed as …

Monsoon (Review) – A journey into cultural identity and belonging

Hong Khaou’s second film ‘Monsoon‘ follows on from the themes of grief, cultural identity and belonging of his first feature ‘Lilting‘. While also charting a different path to his debut feature. As he explores the death of a parent and the need of second generation children in discovering the cultural identity and heritage of family. The directors trademark sensitivity and …

The Lighthouse (Review) – How long have we been on this rock?

Waves batter an isolated rock, as the gulls circle looking for their next meal. The beaming torch of the barnacled lighthouse providing safety for travelling sailors. While the keepers of the light slowly descend into insanity. Following his 2015 horror masterpiece The Witch, Director Roger Eggers gives us a maritime nightmare of epic proportions. The claustrophobic 1.19:1 aspect ratio working …

Honey Boy (Review) – Young fame and the misguided support of a troubled parent

Born in 1986, Shia LaBeouf found fame at young age through stand up comedy and then the Disney Channel. His talent finding worldwide stardom with the 2007 hit Disturbia. However, as with many child actors before him, the journey to this point was far from glamourous. A journey fraught with alcohol, anger and internal struggle. Written by LaBeouf, ‘Honey Boy’ …

Jojo Rabbit (Review) – A stunning satirical dissection of hate and fascism

Lampooning fascism and Nazi ideology can be a tightrope walk for any Director. The sensitivities of history still raw and full of emotion for many. Therefore creating a need to balance humour with the true horror of war and hate. With Jojo Rabbit, Director Taika Waititi takes aim at the indoctrination of youth, while mixing a coming of age tale …

The King (Review) – An insecure but stoic young King in a world of political manipulation

Henry IV part one and two and Henry V combine into a singular story that plays homage to Shakespeare’s characters. While creating a completely fresh take on his famous plays in David Michôd’s new Netflix film The King. The King is not a Shakespearian adaptation, and anyone watching the film expecting such, should watch the divine ‘The Hollow Crown’ instead. …